Somalia: gov’t condemns Swedish remarks against Saudi Arabia

Somalia’s UN-backed weak central government for the first time embroiled itself in diplomatic spat between Saudi Arabia and Sweden, condemning the latter for blatant interference, Garowe Online reports.

In a statement leaked online on Tuesday, and seen by GO, Somalia Government called the recent remarks by Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom ‘interference’ in the domestic affairs of the gulf state.

“This behavior is clearly prohibited by the diplomatic norms and practices,” read a statement from Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Investment promotion.

Moreover, Mogadishu-based federal government urged Sweden to respect the country’s right to self-determination and sovereignty-something analysts believe would draw the Horn of African nation into trivial squabbling.

“The blessed religion of Islam and its laws was brought to mankind so as to ensure the dignity, freedoms and integrity of all humans,” the statement added, while declaring Sweden criticisms ‘offensive’.

Human rights Watch accused Saudi Arabia of expelling Somalis fleeing from danger at home.

Approximately 12, 000 Somali refugees have been repatriated over the last two years according to the Human Rights watchdog.

Somalia got first-ever permanent government for the first time in 22 years in 2012.

International community members previously voiced concern over the slow pace of the country’s timetable towards election by 2016, with the US lambasting President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud for poor leadership.

The decision by Somalia government to interfere with the diplomatic row between the two countries went viral on social media, with some praising Sweden while others pointed to the rampant corruption, chronic insecurity and persistent political infighting that saw two Prime Ministers removed in two years.

A coalition of armed oppositions toppled the country’s longstanding military government in 1991, followed by piracy and terrorism which mainly reigned through the south-central regions.

Comments

comments

SHARE